Introducing Skookum JS, a JavaScript runtime

Today I’m happy to announce the humble beginnings of a project I started a while ago: Skookum JS, a JavaScript runtime.

sjs

“A JavaScript runtime???” Yes, pretty much like Node, but with a different model. Skookum JS (sjs henceforth) uses the Duktape JavaScript engine to implement a runtime similar to Python’s CPython or Ruby’s MRI.

The runtime consists of a CLI utility called sjs which acts as the interpreter and will evaluate JavaScript code, and libsjs, the library which does the heavy lifting and can be embedded in other applications. Any project can add scripting support using JavaScript by linking with libsjs and using its C API.

The runtime model is quite different from Node: there is no builtin event-driven execution, all APIs are (for the most part) object oriented versions of POSIX APIs. Let’s see how to write a socket client which connects to a server, sends ‘hello’, waits for a reply and closes the connection:

I started this project to have some fun (for certain definitions of fun) and learn some more stuff along the way. Even if the project is being open sourced now, the commit history shows its evolution, including all the mistakes and brainfarts, have fun going through it!

My idea is to have a large standard library, including the kitchen sink. Or at least that’s how I feel like today. This initial release contains the basics to get the project off the ground, expect to see improvements.

I’d like to finish this post by thanking its author for Duktape (the JavaScript engine used by sjs). It’s a really easy to use JavaScript engine, with outstanding documentation and great design choices, I couldn’t have done it without it. 10/10 would recommend.

Curious? Bored by Node because it just works? Head over to GitHub for the code, and here for the documentation.

pyuv 0.10.5 (stable) and 0.11.0 (unstable) released!

I’m happy to announce two new pyuv releases today: pyuv 0.10.5 (stable) and 0.11.0 (unstable). Why two releases? For those who may not know, pyuv follows the NodeJS release cycle, that is, odd numbered releases are the so called “unstable” releases, while the even numbered releases are “stable”.

The 0.10.5 release brings  few bugfixes and embeds the latest version of libuv, so you also benefit from the bugfixes in libuv.

pyuv 0.11.0 includes some heavy refactoring of the filesystem operations, which unfortunately are not backwards compatible, but I hope it’s for the best:

In pyuv 0.10x this is the way to stat a file asynchronously:

And here is the equivalent in pyuv 0.11:

All filesystem operations now get a single argument in the callback: the FSRequest object which was returned to the caller when the function was initially called. The loop, path, result and error are now attributes of the request object. Moreover, the request object now has an instance dictionary, so you can attach any attribute to it and use it later:

There have been other big internal changes due to changes in libuv itself, but those are not visible in pyuv since it provides a class-level abstraction.

The next stable release will be pyuv 0.12.0, right when Node 0.12 is launched. Until then 0.10 will remain as the stable branch, and the one installable through PyPI, those of you interested in the latest and the greatest, go fetch master on GitHub 🙂

:wq

 

pyuv 0.10.0 relased!

Today I’m happy to announce that pyuv 0.10.0 has been released! Following libuv’s versioning, this is a stable release, that is, no API changes will occur during the 0.10.x branch cycle.

It has been a while since the last stable release, there have been many changes, even though not all of them are directly visible in the public API. Here is a short list of the most relevant changes for version 0.10.0 since the 0.8 series:

  • Added a true signal watcher
  • Added ability to handle uncaught exceptions (Loop.excepthook)
  • Added TCP.open and UDP.open methods
  • Added support for compilation with Visual Studio in Windows
  • Added thread module with several thread synchronization primitives
  • Added mode parameter to Loop.run (default, once or nowait)
  • Added fileno and get_timeout methods to Loop
  • Added ability to cancel threadpool, getaddrinfo and fs requests
  • Added ability to stop the event loop (Loop.stop)
  • Moved getaddrinfo to util module
  • Removed builtin c-ares resolver
  • Removed get/set process title functions
  • Fixed numerous refcounting issues
  • Multiple fixes for Windows
  • Multiple memory related internal optimizations

There are many more changes, all listed in the changelog file.

I’m glad to say that pyuv is now in better shape than it ever has been. Not only because I have learned many things along the way, but also because I got really good pull requests and help which enhanced pyuv in many different ways. I’m not a Windows guy and got invaluable help from people which helped make pyuv work properly on Windows. Releases 0.9.5-6 contain more commits from others than from myself, and I love that!

Last, I’d like to thank the libuv core team, more specifically Ben and Bert. They do a great job both coding libuv itself and helping others get involved in the project. This is one of the projects I’m really happy I contribute to. Oh, I also scored 4th in the libuv contributions (in lines of code) for Node 0.10.0!

You can get the source code at the usual place, and check the updated documentation here.